Mistletoe

Ice and snow cover the Earth,
Nature says, ‘stay at home
By the fire of the hearth
Now is not the time to roam.’

So on this frosty Yuletide eve,
We burn the Cailleach Nollaig*
And song and laughter we weave
In the light of the Christmas Hag.

We feast and drink sweet mead,
As we relish on the sacrificed Earth
Whose now in death but we know will seed
Once awakened into rebirth.

Under Druid blessed mistletoe
We kiss as the Sun begins to grow,
Because on the deepest, darkest night
We celebrate the rebirth of light!

*The burning of the Cailleach was the ceremonial burning of the Winter Solstice. A piece of wood was carved roughly into the shape of an Old Crone to represent the Spirit of Winter. This was then placed into a fire to burn. As people gathered to watch they would be mindful of the symbolism, that was the ending of all the bad things that had happened the previous year and a fresh start for the next one. “Nollaig” in Scottish is used to refer to Christmas. In Irish it means “December”. “Cailleach” refers to the prototypical Crone figure and thus the old wise woman in Gaelic.

Through A Druid’s Eyes

Through a Druids Eyes

Who would I be if I could not see the beauty before me?
And what would I be without truth?
How can I live without the moon?  The goddess that pulls the tide.
How can I live without the sun?  Where Lugh and Brigit reside.
Why live without the inspiration of bards?  They weave the world into language.
Why live without a love for nature – life?  Without this we only exist.
How can I live without the sky?  That forms the triad with sea and earth.
How can I live without the stars?  The Egyptians knew their worth.
Where would I be without trees?  Their language inscribed as Runes.
Where would I be without animals, my equals?  Watch the Shaman commune with the Racoon.
How can I live without justice with no malice?  Responsibility is our keystone.
How can I live without peace?  There would be no release.
And what would I be without those I cannot see?
Who would I be without history and my ancestry?  Where would I be?

© Jenna Leanne Grabey 2012. All Rights Reserved.
November 2010

Lughnasadh: The Autumn Equinox

Lughnasadh

For the Celtic figure Lugh. He unites people with the land and is therefore illustrious during The Harvest festival, Lughnasadh.

Fruit is yield by trees
Sheaves of corn are cut in the breeze,
With many thanks to the Earth
For she gave her bounty birth.

This is the Earth’s sacrifice
That she performs without a cry,
And the Sun begins to wane
Yet remains faithful to the land.

Lugh in slain
Yet death has no claim,
Because into an eagle he transforms
So with a fawn he sees another dawn.

And now a lone stag looks into relentless skies
And watches as an eagle flies.
The warm sun, now turning cold
Sinks behind ancient hills,
Turning them to enchanting gold.

© Jenna Leanne Grabey 2012. All Rights Reserved.

Misty Glade

Misty Glade

Within a misty glade
Upon the midnight hour
The otherworld boundary fades
In this place of mysterious power

And we listen as we may learn
The truth behind our reflection
Looking at the sky we turn
Searching for that protection

Asking for the answers we know
We sit within natures circle
What is going on below
And why must we feel to know?

© Jenna Grabey 2012. All Rights Reserved.